Sugar Is Back on Food Labels,
This Time as a Selling Point ....
The good news is that it appears that finally our society is beginning to acknowledge the disastrous effects of HFCS (high-fructose corn syrup ) on our health.
Michelle Obama, has said she will not give her children products made with it — has made sugar look good by comparison.

The bad news is just that.
That we begin to see the problem with HFC sugar, which is a man-made fructose, does not mean that suddenly sugar is good for you.
Though research is still under way, many nutrition and obesity experts say sugar and high-fructose corn syrup are equally bad in excess. But, as is often the case with competing food claims, the battle is as much about marketing as it is about science.
The most common argument has to do with the rapid rise of obesity in the United States, and elsewhere, which began in the 1980s, not long after industrial-grade high-fructose corn syrup was invented. As the amount of the sweetener in the American diet has expanded, so have Americans gained weight at an alarming rate.
Anyone who has spent some time reading through some of these pages, knows that it is the refined carbohydrates (white flour, sugar) that cause obesity and not the saturated fats, although we have to realize that it is going to take a while before this will become generally accepted.

High-fructose corn syrup  does NOT metabolize in the same way sugar does. It is a highly processed product that contains similar amounts of unbound fructose and glucose. Sucrose, on the other hand, is a larger sugar molecule that is metabolized into glucose and fructose in your intestine.
High-fructose corn syrup  is metabolized to fat in your body far more rapidly than any other sugar, and, because most fructose is consumed in liquid form, its negative metabolic effects are significantly magnified. Whereas the glucose in other sugars is used by your body, and is converted to blood glucose, fructose is a relatively unregulated source of fuel that your liver converts to fat and cholesterol.

There are over 35 years of hard empirical evidence that refined man-made fructose like high-fructose corn syrup metabolizes to triglycerides and adipose tissue, not blood glucose. The downside of this is that fructose does not stimulate your insulin secretion, nor enhance leptin production. (Leptin is a hormone thought to be involved in appetite regulation.)

Because insulin and leptin act as key signals in regulating how much food you eat, as well as your body weight, this suggests that dietary fructose may contribute to increased food intake and weight gain.

Additionally, a  recent study found that because fructose is much more readily metabolized to fat in your liver than glucose, this can lead to nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD).
This in turn leads to hepatic insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes.
You Can Read All About the HFC story Here

Sugar, though natural and preferable to HFCS or artificial sweeteners like Splenda and aspartame, is NOT a health food.

Refined sugar was almost nonexistent in the diets of most people until very recently. Nowadays, as the New York Times pointed out, American adults ate about 44 pounds of sugar each in 2007, just slightly more than the 40 pounds of HFCS they also ate that year. And anybody who thinks that Canadians are faring much better, had better think again.
We are talking about A LOT of sugar and is especially concerning because it’s been proven over and over that sugar increases your insulin levels, which can lead to:


• High blood pressure and high cholesterol
• Heart disease
• Diabetes
• Weight gain
• Premature aging, and more

The list of health and behaviour problems associated with sugar
is virtually endless.
It almost seems that we are finding more and more health issues
that are sugar related, although we should include of course all
refined carbs since our body does not make a lot of difference
between them.

In juvenile rehabilitation camps, when children were put on a low sugar diet, there was a 44 percent drop in antisocial behavior!!
But of course we knew already that sugar can worsen the symptoms of children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

High sucrose diets of subjects with peripheral vascular disease significantly increases platelet adhesion. (blood clotting and increased risk of stroke and heart attacks.

Sugar can reduce the learning capacity, adversely affect school children's grades and cause learning disorders.

Can cause cataracts and nearsightedness, emphysema,  impair the physiological homeostasis of many systems in your body, lowers the ability of enzymes to function; sugar intake is higher in people with Parkinson's disease, and on and on.

Source:Nancy Appleton, Ph.D
Author of the book Lick The Sugar Habit.

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24.Dufty.

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37.Erlander, S. The Cause and Cure of Multiple Sclerosis, The Disease to End Disease." Mar 3, 1979;1(3):59_63.

38.Crook, W. J. The Yeast Connection. (TN:Professional Books, 1984).

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40.Cleave, T. The Saccharine Disease. (New Canaan, CT: Keats Publishing, 1974).

41.Ibid.

42.Cleave, T. and Campbell, G. (Bristol, England:Diabetes, Coronary Thrombosis and the Saccharine Disease: John Wright and Sons, 1960).

43.Behall, K. Influ ence of Estrogen Content of Oral Contraceptives and Consumption of Sucrose on Blood Parameters. Disease Abstracts International. 1982;431437.

44.Tjäderhane, L. and Larmas, M. A High Sucrose Diet Decreases the Mechanical Strength of Bones in Growing Rats. Journal of Nutrition. 1998:128:1807_1810.

45.Beck, Nielsen H., Pedersen O., and Schwartz S. Effects of Diet on the Cellular Insulin Binding and the Insulin Sensitivity in Young Healthy Subjects. Diabetes. 1978;15:289_296 .

46.Sucrose Induces Diabetes in Cat. Federal Protocol. 1974;6(97). diabetes

47.Reiser, S., et al. Effects of Sugars on Indices on Glucose Tolerance in Humans. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 1986;43:151-159.

48.Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism. Aug 2000

49.Hodges, R., and Rebello, T. Carbohydrates and Blood Pressure. Annals of Internal Medicine. 1983:98:838_841.

50.Behar, D., et al. Sugar Challenge Testing with Children Considered Behaviorally Sugar Reactive. Nutritional Behavior. 1984;1:277_288.

51.Furth, A. and Harding, J. Why Sugar Is Bad For You. New Scientist. Sep 23, 1989;44.

52.Simmons, J. Is The Sand of Time Sugar? LONGEVITY. June 1990:00:00 49_53.

53.Appleton, N. New York: LICK THE SUGAR HABIT. Avery Penguin Putnam:1988. allergies

54.Cleave, T. The Saccharine Disease: (New Canaan Ct: Keats Publishing, Inc., 1974).131.

55.Ibid. 132

56.Pamplona, R., et al. Mechanisms of Glycation in Atherogenesis. Medical Hypotheses . 1990:00:00 174_181.

57.Vaccaro O., Ruth, K. J. and Stamler J. Relationship of Postload Plasma Glucose to Mortality with 19 yr Follow up. Diabetes Care. Oct 15,1992;10:328_334. Tominaga, M., et al, Impaired Glucose Tolerance Is a Risk Factor for Cardiovascular Disease, but Not Fasting Glucose. Diabetes Care. 1999:2(6):920-924.

58.Lee, A. T. and Cerami, A. Modifications of Proteins and Nucleic Acids by Reducing Sugars: Possible Role in Aging. Handbook of the Biology of Aging. (New York: Academic Press, 1990.).

59.Monnier, V. M. Nonenzymatic Glycosylation, the Maillard Reaction and the Aging Process. Journal of Gerontology 1990:45(4):105_110.

60.Cerami, A., Vlassara, H., and Brownlee, M. Glucose and Aging. Scientific American. May 1987:00:00 90

61.Dyer, D. G., et al. Accumulation of Maillard Reaction Products in Skin Collagen in Diabetes and Aging. Journal of Clinical Investigation. 1993:93(6):421_22.

62.Veromann, S.et al."Dietary Sugar and Salt Represent Real Risk Factors for Cataract Development." Ophthalmologica. 2003 Jul-Aug;217(4):302-307.

63.Goulart, F. S. Are You Sugar Smart? American Fitness. March_April 1991:00:00 34_38. Milwakuee, WI

64.Monnier, V. M. Nonenzymatic Glycosylation, the Maillard Reaction and the Aging Process. Journal of Gerontology. 1990:45(4):105_110.

65.Ceriello, A. Oxidative Stress and Glycemic Regulation. Metabolism. Feb 2000;49(2 Suppl 1):27-29.

66.Appleton, Nancy. New York; Lick the Sugar Habit. Avery Penguin Putnam, 1988 enzymes

67.Hellenbrand, W. Diet and Parkinson's Disease. A Possible Role for the Past Intake of Specific Nutrients. Results from a Self-administered Food-frequency Questionnaire in a Case-control Study. Neurology. Sep 1996;47(3):644-650.

68.Goulart, F. S. Are You Sugar Smart? American Fitness. March_April 1991:00:00 34_38.

69.Ibid.

70.Yudkin, J., Kang, S. and Bruckdorfer, K. Effects of High Dietary Sugar. British Journal of Medicine. Nov 22, 1980;1396.

71.Blacklock, N. J., Sucrose and Idiopathic Renal Stone. Nutrition and Health. 1987;5(1-2):9- Curhan, G., et al. Beverage Use and Risk for Kidney Stones in Women. Annals of Internal Medicine. 1998:28:534-340.

72.Goulart, F. S. Are You Sugar Smart? American Fitness. March_April 1991:00:00 34_38. Milwakuee, WI,:

73.Ibid. fluid retention

74.Ibid. bowel movement

75.Ibid. compromise the lining of the capillaries

76.Nash, J. Health Contenders. Essence. Jan 1992; 23:00 79_81.

77.Grand, E. Food Allergies and Migraine.Lancet. 1979:1:955_959.

78.Schauss, A. Diet, Crime and Delinquency. (Berkley Ca; Parker House, 1981.)

79.Molteni, R, et al. A High-fat, Refined Sugar Diet Reduces Hippocampal Brain-derived Neurotrophic Factor, Neuronal Plasticity, and Learning. NeuroScience. 2002;112(4):803-814.

80.Christensen, L. The Role of Caffeine and Sugar in Depression. Nutrition Report. Mar 1991;9(3):17-24.

81.Ibid,44

82.Yudkin, J. Sweet and Dangerous.(New York:Bantam Books,1974) 129

83.Frey, J. Is There Sugar in the Alzheimer's Disease? Annales De Biologie Clinique. 2001; 59 (3):253-257.

84.Yudkin, J. Metabolic Changes Induced by Sugar in Relation to Coronary Heart Disease and Diabetes. Nutrition and Health. 1987;5(1-2):5-8.

85.Yudkin, J and Eisa, O. Dietary Sucrose and Oestradiol Concentration in Young Men. Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism. 1988:32(2):53-55.

86.The Edell Health Letter. Sept 1991;7:1.

87.Gardner, L. and Reiser, S. Effects of Dietary Carbohydrate on Fasting Levels of Human Growth Hormone and Cortisol. Proceedings of the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine. 1982;169:36_40.

88.Journal of Advanced Medicine. 1994;7(1):51-58.

89.Ceriello, A. Oxidative Stress and Glycemic Regulation. Metabolism. Feb 2000;49(2 Suppl 1):27-29.

90.Postgraduate Medicine.Sept 1969:45:602-07.

91.Lenders, C. M. Gestational Age and Infant Size at Birth Are Associated with Dietary Intake among Pregnant Adolescents. Journal of Nutrition. Jun 1997;1113- 1117

92.Ibid.

93.Sugar, White Flour Withdrawal Produces Chemical Response. The Addiction Letter. Jul 1992:04:00 Colantuoni, C., et al. Evidence That Intermittent, Excessive Sugar Intake Causes Endogenous Opioid Dependence. Obes Res. Jun 2002 ;10(6):478-488. Annual Meeting of the American Psychological Society, Toronto, June 17, 2001 www.mercola.com/2001/jun/30/sugar.htm

94.Ibid.

95.Sunehag, A. L., et al. Gluconeogenesis in Very Low Birth Weight Infants Receiving Total Parenteral Nutrition Diabetes. 1999 ;48 7991_800.

96.Christensen L., et al. Impact of A Dietary Change on Emotional Distress. Journal of Abnormal Psychology.1985;94(4):565_79.

97.Nutrition Health Review. Fall 85 changes sugar into fat faster than fat

98.Ludwig, D. S., et al. High Glycemic Index Foods, Overeating and Obesity. Pediatrics. March 1999;103(3):26-32.

99.Pediatrics Research. 1995;38(4):539-542. Berdonces, J. L. Attention Deficit and Infantile Hyperactivity. Rev Enferm. Jan 2001;4(1)11-4

100.Blacklock, N. J. Sucrose and Idiopathic Renal Stone. Nutrition Health. 1987;5(1 & 2):9-

101.Lechin, F., et al. Effects of an Oral Glucose Load on Plasma Neurotransmitters in Humans. Neurophychobiology. 1992;26(1-2):4-11.

102.Fields, M. Journal of the American College of Nutrition. Aug 1998;17(4):317_321.

103.Arieff, A. I. Veterans Administration Medical Center in San Francisco. San Jose Mercury; June 12/86. IVs of sugar water can cut off oxygen to the brain.

104.Sandler, Benjamin P. Diet Prevents Polio. Milwakuee, WI,:The Lee Foundation for for Nutritional Research, 1951

105.Murphy, Patricia. The Role of Sugar in Epileptic Seizures. Townsend Letter for Doctors and Patients. May, 2001 Murphy Is Editor of Epilepsy Wellness Newsletter, 1462 West 5th Ave., Eugene, Oregon 97402

106.Stern, N. & Tuck, M. Pathogenesis of Hypertension in Diabetes Mellitus. Diabetes Mellitus, a Fundamental and Clinical Test. 2nd Edition, (PhiladelphiA; A:Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2000)943-957.

107.Christansen, D. Critical Care: Sugar Limit Saves Lives. Science News. June 30, 2001; 159:404.

108.Donnini, D. et al. Glucose May Induce Cell Death through a Free Radical-mediated Mechanism.Biochem Biohhys Res Commun. Feb 15, 1996:219(2):412-417.

109.Schoenthaler, S. The Los Angeles Probation Department Diet-Behavior Program: Am Empirical Analysis of Six Institutional Settings. Int J Biosocial Res 5(2):88-89.

110.Gluconeogenesis in Very Low Birth Weight Infants Receiving Total Parenteral Nutrition. Diabetes. 1999 Apr;48(4):791-800.

111.Glinsmann, W., et al. Evaluation of Health Aspects of Sugar Contained in Carbohydrate Sweeteners." FDA Report of Sugars Task Force -1986 39 123 Yudkin, J. and Eisa, O. Dietary Sucrose and Oestradiol Concentration in Young Men. Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism. 1988;32(2):53-5.
And if you think this is not too good, it appears on ly the beginning of what could quite well be the end of human civilisation as we have known it.
The world according to Monsanto
The Future of Food -- You NEED to Watch This Video!!!


Whenever we talk about sugar we should at least distinguish between sucrose, fructose and glucose.
For a great understanding of what is really involved you should take about 1 1/2 hr to watch this video from the University of California. Maybe do it with the whole family. Your life will never be the same again.
And Yes! you may add ten years to your life.